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Have we left Christ out of Christianity?

29 Aug

That seems to be the central question addressed by Michael Horton in his book, Christless Christianity: The alternative gospel of the American church. The first chapter alone contained a number of convicting, if not downright damning quotes. Here are the ones that captured my attention:

It is easy to become distracted from Christ as the only hope for sinners. Where everything is measured by our happiness rather than by God’s holiness, the sense of our being sinners becomes secondary, if not offensive. If we are good people who have lost our way but with the proper instructions and motivation can become a better person, we need only a life coach, not a redeemer. We can still give our assent to a high view of Christ and the centrality of his person and work, but in actual practice we are being distracted from “looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith” (Heb. 12:2). (p. 15-16)

I think that the church in America today is so obsessed with being practical, relevant, helpful, successful, and perhaps even well-liked that it nearly mirrors the world itself. Aside from the packaging, there is nothing that cannot be found in most churches today that could not be satisfied by any number of secular programs and self-help groups. (p. 16-17)

My concern is that we are getting dangerously close to the place in everyday American church life where the Bible is mined for “relevant” quotes but is largely irrelevant on its own terms; God is used as a personal resource rather than known, worshiped, and trusted; Jesus Christ is a coach with a good game plan for our victory rather than a Savior who has already achieved it for us; salvation is more a matter of having our best life now than being saved from God’s judgment by God himself; and the Holy Spirit is an electrical outlet we can plug into for the power we need to be all that we can be. (p. 19)

My argument in this book is not that evangelicalism is becoming theologically liberal but that it is becoming theologically vacuous. (p. 23)

Ouch! Ouch! Ouch! But way too true.

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2009 in Books, Church, Culture, Quotes

 

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