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How does Christmas meet our needs?

25 Dec

During the Christmas season, we enjoy singing familiar Christmas carols. There are two in particular that cause me to think.

The words to, O Little Town of Bethlehem, say, “O little town of Bethlehem how still we see thee lie! Above thy deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by; Yet in thy dark streets shineth the ever-lasting light; The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.

The carol, Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus, expresses this sentiment: “Come, thou long expected Jesus, born to set thy people free; From our fears and sins release us, let us find our rest in thee. Israel’s strength and consolation, hope of all the earth thou art; Dear desire of every nation, joy of every longing heart.”

After singing these carols, I was struck with this question, “If the words of these two Christmas carols are correct, what hopes, fears, and desires are met in Christ? How does Christmas meet our needs?”

The search for an answer to that question took me to the gospel of John. Seven times in that gospel, Jesus makes the statement, “I am . . .” Through these statements, Jesus reveals his identity and purpose in coming to earth. In so doing, I believe that Jesus meets us at our point of need.

Each one of us longs for satisfaction. In John 6:35, Jesus said, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.” Hunger and thirst are two of the most basic needs of life. They reveal a desire for satisfaction and contentment. As the bread of life, Jesus satisfies the deepest desires of our hearts.

Many times throughout our lives, we need guidance and direction. In John 8:12, “Jesus spoke to them, saying, ‘I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.’” When the power goes out, we look for candles or flashlights to lead us to safety. Children want a light to lead them to mom & dad. As the light of the world, Jesus leads us out of the darkness and guides us to safety.

John 10:7–9 reveals another aspect of Jesus’ identity. “So Jesus again said to them, ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep. All who came before me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not listen to them. I am the door. If anyone enters by me, he will be saved and will go in and out and find pasture.’” A door keeps out the bad people—the thieves and robbers. It makes us feel secure. But it also opens to a place where we can rest and relax. As the door, Jesus brings us into a place of rest, safety, and provision.

In John 10:11–14, Jesus meets our need for belonging. “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. He who is a hired hand and not a shepherd, who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. He flees because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep. I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me.” Jesus is more than a hired hand who takes care of people. As the good shepherd, Jesus knows our name and our needs. He builds a relationship with us. He treats us as part of his family.

John 11:25 addresses the question of whether there is hope beyond the grave. “Jesus said to her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live.’” As the resurrection and the life, Jesus assures us that heaven awaits for those who believe in Christ

We live in a world of multiculturalism, pluralism, and world religions. We are told that truth is what you determine for yourself. Every belief is of equal value. We are left confused and wondering. In John 14:6, Jesus addresses our need for certainty. “Jesus said to him, ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.’” As the way, the truth, and the life, Jesus gives us a sense of certainty in an age of perplexity.

At times, we may feel like our lives and careers are going nowhere. We feel as if we are spinning our wheels. In John 15:5, Jesus said, “I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.” As the vine, Jesus produces fruit in us if we stay connected to him. Jesus will give our lives purpose and meaning.

During the holiday season, our eyes are drawn to scenes of the nativity; to the babe lying in a manger. This year, let your heart come closer. Draw near to the One who says “I Am the Bread of Life, the Light, the Door, the Good Shepherd, the Resurrection, the Way, and the Vine”.

If you are . . .

  • Hungry, yet longing for something to truly satisfy.
  • Lost and alone in the dark, searching for answers and guidance.
  • Feeling insecure and defenseless, or searching for security and protection that will be there when you need it.
  • Feel like you don’t belong, and are searching for a sense of family and relationship.
  • Long for the assurance that there is more to life than just this—that there is life beyond the grave.
  • Confused by so many different beliefs and options, and are searching for certainty in an age of perplexity.
  • Wondering if you matter and if your life will make a difference, longing for a sense of significance and a source of fruitfulness.

. . . then come to Jesus. He will sooth your fears and satisfy the deepest longings of your heart.

This message was preached at First Central Bible Church in Chicopee, MA, on December 25, 2016. It was part of a collection of sermons on Christmas. Please click on the link to download a copy of the sermon notes.

 

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